The Mouth To Gut Connection Naturopathy Advice Brisbane CBD

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Microbiome To Microbiome

The Mouth To Gut Connection 

Patrick Thompson‘s Naturopathy clinic at New Farm Physiotherapy can assist you in improving your health and well being.  His experience in handling gut problems, improving diet and supplementing nutrition has been a valuable service for the New Farm community over many years.

 

Natural medicine practitioners have long referred to the Gut as our second brain. Many recent studies have confirmed the guts or more specially, the gut microbiomes connection to the brain, and to our overall mental and physical health. To keep the gut microbiome healthy is therefore important, so looking at what significantly influences its health is vital in maintaining and improving our health. The best place to start, like most things in life, is at the beginning.

 

Where the largest population of our microbial friends live is in our large intestine, which is pretty much the end point of our Gastrointestinal Tract (GIT). Right at the beginning of the Gastrointestinal Tract is the mouth, the oral cavity. Here begins the process of digestion, the chewing of food, the mixing of food with saliva; saliva that is laced with trillions of microbes from member nations of the oral microbiome.  The oral microbiome is made of between 500 – 700 species of microbes, 40 – 50% of which are common to the mouth and the gut.

 

We now know that most of the disease processes present in our body including immune, digestion and brain are linked to an imbalance of the gut microbiome; microbial dybiosis. This is more easily understood when you realise the cells in the gut and its microbial populations work in synergy by moving, digesting and absorbing nutrients, fighting off pathogens, capturing heavy metals, and secreting hormones, vitamins and fatty acids that all play a role in managing the integrity of a healthy gut barrier. Microbial dysbiosis in the gut may compromise the integrity of the gut barrier. A compromised gut barrier or gut lining has a detrimental effect on the operation of the immune system and is linked to a range of chronic diseases. Microbial dysbiosis in the gut and chronic disease are end points; the cause may start right back up stream in the oral cavity. There is a clear link between oral disease and systemic disease. Impairment of our oral microbiome has a flow on effect on microbial flora and disease in the whole body.

 

Think of our digestive tract as a stream and our mouth as the headwater or source of the stream. The quality of the stream source will affect the health of the whole stream. It is the same as when we swallow food. The saliva coated food contains both good and bad bacteria; the ratio between good and bad depends on the health of your oral cavity and the food you consume. Good bacteria in your mouth perform protective functions such as releasing acids that keep decay causing bacteria under control and others protect against strains that causes gum disease. Research shows that microbes implicated in gum disease can alter the gut bacterial makeup causing chronic disease such as cirrohosis of the liver.

 

Our gut microbiome has a major say in our overall health and well being, but it’s our oral microbiome that is essential to keeping the gut microbiome healthy. The oral microbiome flows through our body, down the digestive tract, to influence the makeup of our gut microbiome.  It’s here in the farthest reaches of our digestive system, that microbes demonstrate their importance to the overall function of our body. Keeping our gut microbiome healthy starts with a healthy mouth and a balanced and diverse oral microbiome.

 

To ensure you have a balanced and diverse oral microbiome follow a few simple rules.

 

Rule number one, diet is the king.

  • Remove processed foods.
  • Eat whole foods.
  • Remove sugar and fruit drinks from your diet.
  • Eat a variety of fibre rich fruit and veggies.
  • Regularly include fermented and probiotic foods.
  • Choose to include prebiotic foods like onions, shallots, unripe bananas, which specifically feed beneficial bacteria.
  • Chew your food!! The saliva created from chewing contain beneficial bacteria that kick-start the digestive process.
  • Brush and floss twice a day and ditch the mouth wash, it kills good bacteria.

Naturopathy

Patrick Thompson’s Naturopathy clinic at New Farm Physiotherapy can assist you in improving your health and well being.  His experience in handling gut problems, improving diet and supplementing nutrition has been a valuable service for the New Farm community over many years.

 

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